BlogResourcesTips & Insights

Issue #169: The Stigma Attached to Mobility Aids in Public Especially for Young Adults & Learning to Say ‘No’ For Your Own Good

Issue #169: The Stigma Attached to Mobility Aids in Public Especially for Young Adults & Learning to Say 'No' For Your Own Good | A Chronic Voice | Featured Image

Friday, 12 July 2019. Issue #169.

In this issue: Learning to protect yourself from toxic people, and your own mental and physical wellbeing. Trying to see how far I can go in the WeGo Health Awards this year, as someone who’s not from the US! Validation of pain is liberating, as it often takes years for rare disease patients to find a correct diagnosis and willing doctor. The stigma attached to mobility aids in public, where you need to prove you ‘deserve’ to use them. A mini home pharmacy – what just about every spoonie owns! ME/CFS is invisible torture, draining you of energy with every movement and breath you take. Mess at home are signs of life, and it’s okay if you can’t keep everything in perfect order all the time. Waking up one morning with fatigue, which is still there six years later. The strange turn of friendships with chronic illness. As a caregiver, you may be doing all you can to support your loved one, yet still struggle to understand their ultimate needs.

*Note: This article is meant for educational purposes, and is based on each person’s individual experiences and circumstances. It is not to be substituted for medical advice. Please consult your own doctor before changing or adding new treatment protocols.

Read More: Tips & Tools to Help Regain Independence with a Disability or Chronic Illness

If you liked this article, sign up for our mailing list here so you don’t miss out on our latest posts. You will also receive an e-book full of uplifting messages, quotes and illustrations, as a token of appreciation!

Pin It:
Issue #169: The Stigma Attached to Mobility Aids in Public Especially for Young Adults & Learning to Say ‘No’ For Your Own Good Pinterest Image | A Chronic Voice

Join the discussion

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *