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Issue #288: How to be an Inclusive Employer & Invisible Chronic Illnesses Rarely Sit Well with People Because It’s Unfathomable

Issue #288: How to be an Inclusive Employer & Invisible Chronic Illnesses Rarely Sit Well with People Because It’s Unfathomable

Friday, 29 October 2021. Issue #288.

In This Issue:

  1. The amount of energy taken just to live with chronic illness is unimaginable to someone who’s never experienced it. You can be an inclusive employer by not setting fixed work hours, but trusting that employees with chronic illnesses are capable of getting the job done when they say they will.
  2. When people learn that you have invisible chronic illness, they may sympathise for a while. But usually they will never fathom that it means forever, which rarely sits well with them.
  3. With epilepsy, you could be fine one moment, get a seizure the next and wake to a pounding migraine, feeling horribly unwell.
  4. Sponsors are still wanted for the annual Christmas Giveaway on A Chronic Voice, held for people with chronic illnesses, disabilities and mental illnesses.
  5. Whilst exercise can be good for arthritis, there are some circumstances when it should be avoided, such as when pain has been persistent for over an hour, or you’re experiencing joint inflammation or unusual fatigue.
  6. Healthy people may factor in fatigue and stress levels when applying for a job, but not pain. And not merely ‘pain’, but where, how, why, emergency plans and more.
  7. Living with Antiphospholipid Syndrome means that you need to carry a card stating you’re on warfarin everywhere you go, and check MedScape for medication or food interactions constantly.
  8. The stigma of invisible disabilities are high in society, and people who suffer from them are less likely to receive support, whether from loved ones or the government.
  9. One of the biggest coping factors can be exchanging support and stories with others in the chronic pain community online.
  10. Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) can cause a person to seemingly overreact, when it’s an involuntary response.

*Note: This article is meant for educational purposes, and is based on each person’s individual experiences and circumstances. It is not to be substituted for medical advice. Please consult your own doctor before changing or adding new treatment protocols.

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