Tips & Insights

Issue #257: A Lot of the Time Research Falls on the Patient with a Rare Disease & The Problem When Pharmacists Play Doctor Yet Know Nothing About Your Personal Medical History

Issue 257: A Lot of the Time Research Falls on the Patient with a Rare Disease & The Problem When Pharmacists Play Doctor Yet Know Nothing About Your Personal Medical History

Friday, 19 March 2021. Issue #257.

In This Issue:

  1. Every single one of us matter within the chronic illness community, in society and as an individual.
  2. If you’ve never reached the point where you’d rather choose a painless death over a sudden fulfilment of your biggest dream, then you don’t quite understand suicide ideation and severe depression.
  3. Medications often wipe out the immune system’s defences, and germs are now free to invade when people get careless with transmissible diseases.
  4. People with Antiphospholipid Syndrome loves to travel as much as the next person, but need to take extra precautionary steps as diets tend to change overseas.
  5. Managing multiple chronic illnesses is tough not only on the body, but also the mind. Psychological support can be of great help.
  6. A lot of the time, research falls on the patient when they have a rare disease. Always keep searching for answers, when the doctor believes you are ‘fine’ but you know that you’re not.
  7. The problem when pharmacists play doctor, yet know nothing about your personal medical history.
  8. Chronic illness blogs can be hard to find mainly because there are a lot more medical articles written; actual patients telling their stories serve a purpose and have value, too.
  9. Sometimes when we’re low on energy the adrenaline response kicks in which may feel like we are fine, but there will be a price to pay should we push through it.
  10. When you step into a not-so-good doctor’s office and feel like a body with a set of symptoms, instead of a human being.

*Note: This article is meant for educational purposes, and is based on each person’s individual experiences and circumstances. It is not to be substituted for medical advice. Please consult your own doctor before changing or adding new treatment protocols.

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